50 Towns in 50 States

The Richard Allan Bodine Lounge... have a drink and talk about whatever you'd like

Moderator: Moderator

Post Reply
BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon May 28, 2018 7:07 am

Nevada City, California, should not be confused with Virginia City, Nevada, being in California, and not in Nevada.

Image

The town is seen here during its Christmas Festival.

Image

Interestingly, just as Virginia City was not actually named after Virginia, Nevada City was not named after Nevada. The word "Nevada" is derived from the Spanish for "snow-covered" and simply referred to the nearby mountains. The town was actually called "Nevada" in its early years and the "City" was added to avoid confusion with the state.

Image

Image

A row of buildings downtown including one of the many fire stations in wildfire-prone Nevada County.

Image

Another fire station.

Image

City Hall.

Image

The National Hotel, California's oldest continuously operating hotel, 1853.

Image

The Old Stonehouse, a brewery.

Image

An anomalous Colonial Revival place.

[imghttps://ap.rdcpix.com/969849885/789a15c5de55a30d4a3c98fa0faba872l-m0xd-w1020_h770_q80.jpg][/img]

The Bourne Cottage in nearby Grass Valley State Park.

Image

The Nevada Theater, the state's oldest purpose-built theater (1850s).

Image

The eye-popping Nevada County Courthouse, a WPA project.

Image

Lost Soul
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 52790
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 2:02 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by Lost Soul » Mon May 28, 2018 3:51 pm

California has about 10 nice old gold mining towns in the Sierra Nevada.

Quincy is probably my favorite, because it is very remote, there are other mountain towns nearby, and it is off the tourist track, being an hour and a half from the civilizations of Chico, Susanville or Reno.

Image


Downtown.
Image


Image


Image


Image


Image


Image


Image


Methodists.
Image


Farmer's Market
Image


Courthouse
Image


Image
IMPRISON BUSH!

INDICT HILLARY!

"Lost Soul is largely correct"- VinnyD

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon May 28, 2018 4:26 pm

There are also a Virginia City and a Nevada city in Montana. Betcha didn't see that coming!

They're about a mile apart.

Virginia City bears a passing resemblance to its Nevada sister:

Image

Image

Image

Yes, another opera house. They were sort of like 7-11's in the Old West. "Gimmie two packs of Marlboroughs and 'The Jewel Song' from 'Faust'."

Image

The fire truck is now the town bus. I can't tell if this means there's nothing left to burn down or that no one cares if it does.

Image

The Bale of Hay Saloon has its original bar, fittings, menu and, I hazard to guess, customers.

Image

The Thompson Hickman County Library & Museum looks as if a colonial mansion from Bucks County somehow went west. It is in fact a 1914 building in the Pennsylvania Colonial style. Somehow.

Image

The surprisingly elegant interior.

Image

Calamity Jane lived In Virginia City briefly; Jack Slade, co-founder of the Pony Express, was lynched here; Helen Margaret Duncan, the great paleontologist, was born and raised in Virginia City; Nathaniel Langford, the fiery first superintendent of Yellowstone Park, lived here as did the remarkable Sarah Bickford, the first and to date only African American woman to own and run a utility company. Her office is called the Hangman Building because while she was having it constructed no less than five highwaymen were hung from its various beams.

Nevada City is a bit more log cabiny.

Image

Image

Image

They don't get a lot of traffic.

Image

Still, it looks like a rather charming spot.

Image

Image

Image

While Virginia City is technically still a town, Nevada City is basically an open-air museum at this point, having been restored by the heir to the General Mills fortune.

He also collects automatic music machines and there is a building full of the things in Nevada City.

Image

Image

I guess it beats cheating on your income taxes.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon May 28, 2018 6:55 pm

There's also a Montana City, but it's kind of a shithole.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 2:45 am

Grate pots, LS.

Lost Soul
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 52790
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 2:02 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by Lost Soul » Tue May 29, 2018 3:36 am

Thanks. I thought I snuck it in there successfully. It is a nice spot.
IMPRISON BUSH!

INDICT HILLARY!

"Lost Soul is largely correct"- VinnyD

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 3:59 am

I wasn’t going to do Palm Beach, Florida, because really, who gives a shit? How impressive can naked hedonism, sheer selfishness and vast piles of money be?

Actually, pretty fucking impressive.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Most of the stuff above was, if not actually designed by, at least inspired by the practice of Addison Mizner, who, perhaps more than any other single architect, created the Spanish Colonial Revival style. An American architect who had spent his childhood in Guatemala, Mizner wed the outre and over-scaled details of Latin American Baroque to airy open plans full of terraces, platforms and courtyards. He was highly regarded during his career and even more so after it - he even gained a rare compliment from the notoriously cranky Frank Lloyd Wright, who admired Mizner's massing and the sophistication of his interiors.

Via Mizner, his sexy urban boulevard.

Image

Image

Image

Image

A rare Art Deco house in a city dominated by Mizner.

Image

Image

The conservatory at the Flagler Museum.

Image

Stained glass at the Norton Museum in West Palm Beach.

Image

St. Edward's Church.

Image

Palm Beach Town Hall.

Image

Image

Homes in El Cid, Palm Beach's less exclusive district.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Albert Herter's murals adorn the entry of the Art Society.

Image

There is something foppish about Palm Beach, something gorgeous and frou-frou and ten-thousand-dollar-throw-pillow-darrrrrrrrrrrling that, for some reason, has always made me sick. But if you like it, it is done no better anywhere else on earth. Nice and Monoco are shitholes in comparison.

Fun fact! Palm Beach literally makes me sick.

When I was about 8 years old, my family once went to visit my Great Aunt, a notoriously difficult person, in her home in El Cid. We arrived at her home in the middle of a heat wave. Unaccustomed to such things, I got out of the car, walked past my Great Aunt and into her living room, walked over to her favorite chair, threw up all over it and passed out.

We were never invited back, although she did visit us from time to time in New York.

Lost Soul
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 52790
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 2:02 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by Lost Soul » Tue May 29, 2018 4:27 am

You left out Mar-a-Lago.

Anyway, Palm Beach does nothing for me. Too hot, too flat, yada, yada. Nice vomit story, though.
IMPRISON BUSH!

INDICT HILLARY!

"Lost Soul is largely correct"- VinnyD

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 4:39 am

I thought it was in Boca Raton, but I see you are correct - Palm Beach is in fact the location of Cheeto Benito's gold-plated spread.

Ah well. Just another reason to avoid the place.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 5:12 am

I'm not going to bother with Mar a Lago, but here's a nice shot of the Palm Beach Clock Tower.

Image

User avatar
DianaHaddad
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:03 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by DianaHaddad » Tue May 29, 2018 5:41 am

Isn't El Cid in West Palm?

In Palm Beach there is this little alcove of shops off of a shopping street. One of the places in there has huge floor to ceiling windows, and a pig running around inside. It appeared to be a shopfront, and I was peeking in at the pig. I didn't realize it was a house until the owner came by while I was looking in. Whoops. He wasn't delighted but wasn't a jerk, either.

I was back a few months later, and their window had a sign in it saying "Private Residence". There still wasn't any way to tell it was a house without the sign, though. You'd think some curtains on the window might go a long way--even if you leave them open, it sends the message that it's not a display window. Sheesh.
"Suck it, Trebek."

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 5:47 am

You are correct - although Palm Beach and West Palm Beach share certain municipal laws, they are two separate entities. Which I suppose should prove my lack of interest in either place.

User avatar
DianaHaddad
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:03 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by DianaHaddad » Tue May 29, 2018 5:56 am

Yeah, they're pretty different from each other, from what I've seen. West Palm is more a mixture of demographics and has some sketchy areas in it (as well as nice ones). It's more like a normal city/town, with some of everything. Commercial or not, I've enjoyed some nice January nights in the CityPlace shopping area, sitting outside all night and enjoying the warm air in winter.

Palm Beach appears to be all money, all the time. I don't believe they have riffraff, let alone sketch. I was probably the biggest criminal of the year for looking in the window at the pig.

Actually, I know someone who had private security and then cops called on him for walking down the street in Palm Beach, because he inadvertently set literally one foot on a cobblestone of a driveway, and therefore was on private property. One foot on the street, one on the cobblestone, only becuase he had moved out of the way for a car to pass. The owner had seen him do it. My friend was a visiting artist, in town for a show.
"Suck it, Trebek."

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 6:23 am

I think there is a private club in Palm Beach of which my Great Aunt was a member, because I remember going there and being handed the impression that it was A Very Big Deal.

Which isn't to say that El Cid isn't pretty whoop-de-do.

User avatar
DianaHaddad
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:03 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by DianaHaddad » Tue May 29, 2018 7:00 am

I didn't mean to imply otherwise. West Palm is bigger and has more of everything, and I'm sure that includes fancy people. I would never expect someone like you to have a run of the mill aunt.
"Suck it, Trebek."

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 1:44 pm

Evidently El Cid went through a period of decay in the 60s and 70s as people moved out into new subdivisions. We visited her in '79 or '80, so no wonder she was cranky what with property values falling like a stunned condor.

It has since been restored.

By fags. Again.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue May 29, 2018 1:48 pm

DianaHaddad wrote:
Tue May 29, 2018 7:00 am
I didn't mean to imply otherwise. West Palm is bigger and has more of everything, and I'm sure that includes fancy people. I would never expect someone like you to have a run of the mill aunt.
Image

Something like that.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Thu May 31, 2018 12:16 am

Initially, at least, it would be hard to think of a place less like Palm Beach than Fairhope, Alabama. But don't worry. Rich white people are working on that.

Image

Fairhope was founded in November 1894 (rather late for Alabama) on the site of the former Alabama City as a radical Georgist "Single-Tax" colony by the Fairhope Industrial Association, a group of 28 followers of economist Henry George who had incorporated earlier that year in Des Moines, Iowa. Their corporate constitution explained their purpose in founding a new colony:

"To establish and conduct a model community or colony, free from all forms of private monopoly, and to secure to its members therein equality of opportunity, the full reward of individual efforts, and the benefits of co-operation in matters of general concern."

Image

They established a community half artists' colony, half socialist commune, half libertarian experiment.

Image

Image

Image

In 1907 educator Marietta Johnson founded the School for Organic Education in Fairhope. The school was praised in John Dewey's influential 1915 book Schools of Tomorrow. Dewey and Johnson were founding members of the Progressive Education Association.

Image

Fairhope became a popular wintering spot for artists and intellectuals. Sherwood Anderson, Clarence Darrow, Wharton Esherick, Carl Zigrosser, and Upton Sinclair were among its notable visitors.

Image

The Fairhope Castle, a storybook project built by two locals madly in love. Emphasis on the "mad" part of the equation.

Image

Image

Pilot's Barn, a 19th century wooden structure converted into a home.

Image

Chapel Farm.

Image

Oak Hill Farm.

Image

Image

The famed Old 27 Grill.

Image

I suppose it couldn't last. Fairhope is being rapidly reinvented as a wealthy suburb of Mobile and is being overrun with Fappa Bappa Delta Smelta Uppa Chucka Fucka Cuntas to the laudable horror of its inhabitants.

Image

But I dare say traces of its past would be enough to make the average trumpie shit blood and die.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Fri Jun 01, 2018 12:54 am

However, in comparison to the true anti-Palm Beach, Fairhope could be Trump's toilet.

I give you Little Havana, Florida!

Image

Technically this is actually part of Miami, but I wouldn't blame anyone for not knowing.

Image

Originally a working class Jewish area, the neighborhood changed dramatically with the arrival of thousands of refugees from Castro's coup. It is now the largest neighborhood of Cubans outside of Cuba itself.

Image

The forner Warner House, now home to the Hispanic Ballet.

Image

Image

The tiny Art Deco Tower Theater, from 1930. Still playing films, now mostly in Spanish.

Image

Calle Ocho, once "The Trail", the terminus of Highway 41 and Little Havana's main street.

Image

Image

Image

The famed Ball and Chain, mafioso hideout and former Jewish speakeasy; Billie Holiday was a family friend of one of the owners and often appeared on stage. It has been recently landmarked and restored.

Image

Image

Not a bad little place to grab a nice drink. Or get shot, if history is anything to go by, but hey - you can't beat the authenticity.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue Jun 05, 2018 4:00 am

What I said above about Palm Beach, Florida, would usually go triple for Beverly Hills, California. An overpriced, under-utilized playground for a bunch of annoying princesses all of whom deserve to be kicked in the head.

Image

And yet it is a truly unique small city, a kind of Bloomsbury of cinema, with the full history of film under its belt.

Image

The first thing about Beverly Hills that most people don't know is that it is not part of Los Angeles. It is a separate municipality, thus City Hall above.

The other thing is that, unlike the common LA stereotype, it is perfectly walkable.

Image

The old post office, currently under restoration for a performing arts center.

Image

The magnificent recently restored 1920s cinema, one of the oldest in California and one of the oldest purpose-built cinemas int he world.

Image

Image

Image

Rodeo Drive - the easiest shopping drag in the world to make fun of - until you're actually there.

Image

Image

Trousdale Estates, one of the largest collections of mid-century modern architecture in the world.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Not all of Beverly Hills' famous houses are enormous.

Image

Image

Image

The architecture includes this expressionistic gem from Frank Lloyd Wright...

Image

And this equally Expressionistic fantasy from a set designer in 1921.

Image

And an Art Nouveau fantasy hand-built over 30 years.

Image

The legendary Beverly Hills Hotel, work of Paul Williams, an African American architect and perhaps the most bohemian hotel in the world after the Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles proper.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Greystone Mansion, the founding estate around which the rest of the city was built. It had been a museum for almost a hundred years; its staircase has been filmed hundreds of times and is landmarked as the most common location shot in California.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Early film star Virginia Robinson's mansion is basically a few rooms adjoining a conservatory. Her property was willed to the public as a botanical garden.

Image

Image

Image

Perhaps John Updike said it best (I paraphrase): it behooves us to remember that Beverly Hills was built by people obsessed with spectacle, with drama, with passion, with art - with the art of theater in a new and unknown guise. It was not built by sardine-canners or coal mine owners or some hideous smoke-belching factory for bobby pins and rope.

As Susan Sontag observed, it is camp and not kitsch.

And the above? That's a freeway wall.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:27 am

It's getting a little too posh in here! Let's light out for Leadville, Colorado, seen here against the outline of Mount Massive.

Image

So-called because of the silver mine. Yeah. Silver.

Image

Image

The downtown is a capsule history of Wild West Amurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrica.

Image

Image

Image

There are many Kwaint Kottages.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

And a few that are less so.

Image

Image

They have an Opera House too. Sigh.

Image

And an old saloon.

Image

And every winter they race horses down main street pulling people on skis who then do jumps.

Image

Image

Must be all that...silver in the water.

User avatar
Usher73
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 10111
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2012 11:56 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by Usher73 » Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:48 am

Leadville trivia

What's the connection between Leadville and the Titanic?

User avatar
DianaHaddad
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:03 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by DianaHaddad » Wed Jun 06, 2018 7:56 am

I know! I'll let other people answer so I don't kill the game in the first 2 minutes.

I've been to Leadville a few times and always enjoyed it. It happens to also be the place where the 10th Mountain Division (skiing soldiers) trained.
The 14,000-man division was filled with some of the finest skiers, mountaineers, mule skinners and horsemen in the world, and was the last American division to see combat. However, once the outfit deployed to the mountains of Italy during the closing months of the war, the troops never lost a battle or gave up an inch of ground. After the war, many of its veterans went on to create or expand the ski resorts of Vail, Aspen, and Arapahoe Basin, as well as many other ski areas around the United States.
The famed 10th Mountain Division has a special connection to Leadville. Camp Hale, its main training camp was located just a few miles north of the town on Highway 24. Much of their ski and outdoor training took place at Ski Cooper and nearby wilderness areas. And when it came time for socializing and cutting loose, Leadville was their spot for good fun!
https://leadvilletoday.com/tag/tenth-mountain-division/
"Suck it, Trebek."

Lost Soul
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 52790
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 2:02 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by Lost Soul » Wed Jun 06, 2018 12:23 pm

Unsinkable Molly Brown made a fortune in mining there.

Leadville is a nice town.
IMPRISON BUSH!

INDICT HILLARY!

"Lost Soul is largely correct"- VinnyD

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Wed Jun 06, 2018 8:58 pm

And now for something a little bit different.

Image

Stiltsville, Florida!

Image

This tattered group of wooden houses sits two miles off the coast of Miami's Biscayne Bay and was developed in the 1920s and a just-beyond-the-legal-point of the Coast Guard during Prohibition.

Image

Once a collection of 67 buildings holding casinos, bars, nightclubs, hotels and a nudist colony, Stiltsville's building stock has been whittled down to a mere 7 houses due to the deprecations of hurricanes. Now part of a State Park, the houses are maintained and visited but are no longer inhabited.

Image

Image

During its heyday, this was the place for Miami and visiting elite to see and be NOT seen.

Image

Image

I have the feeling that Stiltsville's days are numbered. Still, what a view.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:04 am

Newport, Oregon, is located on Yaquina Bay, midway up the coast.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

The Sylvia Beach Hotel, named in honor of Sylvia Beach, the expatriate American bookseller and publisher who opened Shakespeare and Company bookstore in Paris in 1919. As opposed to a beach nearby called Sylvia Beach.

Image

A small seaport, Newport is now the home of the research fleet of the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration.

Perhaps not coincidentally, it is also home to the nation's best Aquariums, the Oregon Coast Aquarium.

Image

And the most aggressively townie sea lion colony on the West Coast. Just look at these fat fucks.

Image

"Hand over your pocketbook, lady!"

Image

All of the above were the basis for the fictional location in "Finding Dory".

Image

I've heard of taking your work home with you, but this is ridiculous.

Image

Newport, like Miami, has a Deco District!

Image

It's basically this old movie theater, Hilan Castle and three other buildings, but I like their spirit.

Image

And the Yaquina Bay Bridge.

Image

Image

Seriously? Suck it, Sydney Harbour.

User avatar
lolasf
Former showgirl
Posts: 16195
Joined: Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:24 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by lolasf » Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:09 am

BulletPark wrote:
Mon May 28, 2018 7:07 am
Nevada City, California, should not be confused with Virginia City, Nevada, being in California, and not in Nevada.
That's really cute! I was about 10 minutes away from there 2 weeks ago, but didn't even know it existed.
Things fall apart, it's scientific.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:36 am

Beverly Shores, Indiana, is a small community up against the singing dunes of mighty Lake Michigan.

Image

The train station.

Image

For all its natural beauty, Beverly Shores is perhaps most notable as being the location of a series of houses built for the 1934 World Fair that were then re-erected here by a real estate developer after the fair was dismantled; called the"House of Tomorrow" series, the homes were designed by the avant garde of the day, including the great Norman Bel Geddes.

The "Florida" house.

Image

The "Home of Tomorrow Today"

Image

The "House of Tomorrow" (no relation to the Home of Tomorrow Today) - still in need of restoration.

Image

The beautiful and fully restored Rostone Mansion, largest of the case houses.

Image

the most rustic of the bunch, a "Modern Cabin" design.

Image

Time was not as kind to the World Fair's Colonial Village that the same developer also purchased; only the copy of Old North Church remains, modified as a summer home.

Image

Plus there's the view of Chicago.

Image

User avatar
DianaHaddad
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 12:03 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by DianaHaddad » Mon Jun 11, 2018 7:27 am

What an interesting place Beverly Shores is. I had never heard of it, and now would like to visit. The first picture looked like a Massachusetts beach (in fact it looked like the one in my avatar.)


The Newport OR pics reminded me a lot of Ketchikan.
"Suck it, Trebek."

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Mon Jun 11, 2018 7:38 am

Beverly Shores is very small, but evidently has beaches that rival those of Cape Cod. The resemblance would have been even more pronounced had the full Colonial Village survived. Alas, there is a difference between an exhibition designed to be lived in and one that is designed to look like it is lived in.

FUUZ
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 8320
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:41 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by FUUZ » Tue Jun 12, 2018 12:20 am

MKO, the Mauna Kea Observatories, which are 13 astronomical observatories near the top of Mauna Kea volcano on the island of Hawaai,
are sort of a half assed 'town', although I doubt anyone lives there full time. If they wanted to get a full time, 24 hour resident, they could recruit someone from South America, where there are some people who live at about the same, or a higher, elevation. The MKO is about 13,700 ft above sea level.
As I wander and chunder, I ponder and wonder.
I'm Slumming in Bedlam. Amuse me.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:24 pm

Zoar, Ohio, was founded by German religious dissenters called the Society of Separatists of Zoar in 1817. It was named after the Biblical village to which Lot and his family escaped from Sodom. It was a communal society, with many German-style structures that have been restored and are part of the Zoar Village State Memorial and National Historic Landmark.

Image

Image

Image

The Number One House, a communal apartment-style dwelling.

Image

The rambling Zoar Hotel, under restoration.

Image

The hotel's spiral staircase.

Image

Image

The lovely Late Federal church.

Image

A rare example of German colonial construction based on traditional medieval methods.

Image

The Zoar Store, whore.

Image

The old schoolhouse, now an inn/museum.

Image

The Zoar Garden, whore.

Image

The local clink.

Image

Cute place, eh?

Notice that earthwork that curves around the town in the upper photo?

According to Wikipedia:

"The future of the village is threatened because a Tuscarawas River levee that protects the village has been given the lowest safety rating by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The village sits at the base of the levee, which was built by the Corps in 1936 as part of its water management program in the region.

With the levee in failing condition, the Corps was evaluating three alternatives:

Repair the levee
Purchase the village, tear it down, and let the area flood
Relocate the village to higher ground.
The Zoar Village Government and the Zoar Community Association are working to preserve the Village where it stands and have created the Save Historic Zoar Association.[13]

Initial Corps estimates, as of mid-2012, put the cost of repairing the levee at about $130 million, slightly less than $1 million per resident. In June 2012 the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed Zoar on its annual list of "America's eleven most endangered historic places."[14]

In November 2013 the Corps, following further review, reclassified the levee's safety rating from 1 (lowest) to Dam Safety Action Classification 3, meaning the possibility of failure is moderate to high. An expedited full evaluation is to occur within a year. In so doing, the Corps also dropped the option of breaching the levee from the list of solutions being considered, and study options for repairing the existing levee, thereby significantly reducing the likelihood that the village will have to be destroyed or relocated."

Drink if you've got 'em.

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:08 pm

BulletPark wrote:
Wed Jun 06, 2018 6:27 am

Image
is that a traditional Thai house in Leadville?
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:10 pm

I think it's supposed to be Norwegian.

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:22 pm

ah -- you're right! fascinating

medieval Scandinavian architecture

Image

Image
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:10 pm

Nauvoo, Illinois, was the first city founded by the Mormons.

Image

Mormon cult founder Joseph Smith moved his congregation from Central New York State to Illinois and took up residence first in this charming cabin.

Image

And then later in this rather fine Late Federal style house.

Image

The rest of the town followed suit, and Nauvoo came into being as a architecturally distinguished Greek Revival community featured a unique stepped gable vernacular and stressing simplicity, neatness and order.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

There's always one twat who didn't get the memo.

Image

The Old Stone Bridge.

Image

The Old Stone Church (I sense a theme).

Image

Anything else that's Old Stone? Yes! The Jail.

Image

Not Stone.

Image

Seventies Hall, a meeting house for the community elders. Sort of a Mormon Mar-a-Lago.

Image

The Cultural Hall. A Hall of Culture. Sort of like Brenda Dickson's Fashion Face. A Hall. Full of Culture.

Image

The town prospered until the local non-Mormons got sick of their neighbors' well-ordered lives of Godliness and beat the ever-loving shit out of them. The Mormons then moved westward, to the hive of sensual delight we know and cherish as Salt lake City. The Icarians moved in to pick up the local-fanatical-cult-role but fared little better and the town itself went into a long downward spiral.

Its most impressive building was undoubtedly the magnificent Temple, which burned down after the Mormons let and then was hit by a tornado. (Gee - it's almost as if God didn't like them either.) The ruins proved popular with local artists delighted to find something Pirenasian to draw.

Image

Then in 2002 the Mormons came back and rebuilt the place.

Image

Why? Echo answers why.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Tue Jun 12, 2018 10:11 pm

You'll be glad to hear that the town of Micanopy, Florida, was not founded by religious whack jobs.

Image

While the good people of Zoar and Nauvoo were getting all po-faced about Brotherhood, the folks of Micanopy were naked, clueless and feeling goooooooooooooooooooooooooooood.

Image

The first community founded under United States control of Florida, Micanopy is far more an old town of the Deep South than the Spanish influenced communities of the coastal areas.

Image

Image

Image

The MacIntosh Mansion of 1843, now a museum.

Image

A smokehouse.

Image

The Historical Society. Yes, that is an original Coca Cola ad of which they are right proud, Miss.

Image

More ample parking. Note the small barn now under the larger barn, as one doesn't wish to leave one's things out in the rain.

Image

Image

Image

Image

This is probably as fancy as the place gets:

Image

Image

Image

But not as weird.

Image

The amazingly creepy cemetery. There is some thought it inspired a story by H. P. Lovecraft.

Image

Image

They filmed Doc Hollywood here back in the day. Also, River Phoenix grew up here which probably explains a lot.

Image

Paynes Prairie State Park! Isn't it lovely?

Image

An alligator, coming to eat your useless ass.

Image

Don't worry! The buffalo scared him away.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:18 am

No gators or buffalo in Monterey, California!

Image

They're not great with cliffs, evidently.

Image

You can catch a huge case of crabs, though.

Image

The oldest port in Spanish California, its wharf predates the more famous structure in San Francisco.

Image

Old Stormy Light.

Image

The Cathedral of San Carlos Borromeo, the oldest Cathedral in California.

Image

The oldest theater building in California, built as a tavern and then converted in 1850.

Image

It has been augmented by a number of newer venues including the Golden State.

Image

The famed Larkin House in the Presidio District, forerunner of the Monterey Style.

Image

A house in Monterey in the Monterey Style, a colonial blip that had regionalists creaming in their pants back in the day. See the little balcony? That's evidently some impressive shit right there.

Image

The Cooper Molera Adobe, another one of the houses that started the craze.

Image

The Monterey Hotel downtown.

Image

The Santa Catalina School, also in the Monterey Style.

Image

The best color picture I could find of Ernest Coxhead's amazing Episcopal Church, sadly altered. His Cathedral in San Francisco was destroyed in the Great Earthquake of 1906 and was probably the single greatest work of 19th century architecture in California. Search out his work where and when you can - you will not be disappointed.

Houses in nearby Pacific Grove.

Image

Image

The Greene Mansion, which some prick painted Pinke.

Image

Not to be confused with Green Gables.

Image

Image

Probably the most photographed tree on the planet, the Lone Cypress at 16 Mile Drive.

The famed Cannery Row, setting for the novel and later film of the same name.

Image

The Old Monterey Inn, which was not the setting for Cannery Row.

Image

Image

And we can't leave without a look at the old Whaling Station!

Image

Featuring the last surviving example of what used to be a thing - a whalebone sidewalk.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Wed Jun 13, 2018 5:13 pm

Edenton, North Carolina, is appropriately named.

Image

It is perhaps the most graceful of the Carolina coastal towns.

Image

Image

Image

Hayes Plantation, featured in my Greatest Hits thread.

Image

St. Paul's, from 1735 onward.

Image

The New Courthouse (1767).

Image

Houses in the historic district.

Image

Image

Image

Athol Plantation.

Image

Beverly Hall (no relation to Beverly Hills) (Either one).

Image

An unexpectedly urban-looking Federal period house.

Image

Downtown.

Image

The Cupola House from the early 18th century, the only surviving example of Jacobean architecture in the state.

Image

Pembrooke Hall.

Image

And a last shot of the lighthouse.

Image

No word on how soon all of this will be inundated with rising ocean levels or - worse - pudgies playing golf.

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:18 pm

Edenton, yes -- beautiful town! i didnt even recognize, even though i have been there many times...

thanks for this
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Thu Jun 14, 2018 4:00 am

Woo hoo! Someone is reading this thing!

Although I'm actually surprised no one has said anything about Stiltsville.

I mean a collection of speakeasies and strip clubs two miles out into the ocean?

What's not to like?

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:17 pm

you really are showing how many interesting places there are in the US
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:37 pm

Thomasville, Georgia, was a prosperous agricultural center prior to the Civil War.

Image

Image

Image

Image

After the Civil War, doctors believed that pine trees cured tuberculosis and guess what Thomasville is plunked into the middle of.

Image

An influx of wealthy Northerners flooded into the place, raising the population from 5,000 to 15,000 during the winter months and restoring the original plantations as second homes. The locals initially were not delighted with the visitors but soon realized "A Yankee was worth four times a bale of cotton and is five times easier to pick."

Image

Image

Image

Image

Pebble Hill.

Image

Image

Millpond, house with the largest conservatory in Georgia. It is essentially a small city park with a house attached.

Image

Image

Image

Cinnquapin.

Image

Image

Image

Image

The Lapham Mansion, designed by an alcoholic tarantula.

Image

The Church of All Saints.

Image

The Big Oak, a big oak.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:11 am

There's not much to the community of Grand Coteau, Louisiana.

Image

But what there is of it is, as Tracy said of Hepburn's body, "cherce".

Originally named Buzzard's Prairie, the village was once home to no less than nine thriving brothels.

Image

The fun came to an end when a wealthy local woman sponsored two nuns to found a new girl's academy in 1821, the second oldest such institution in Louisiana.

Image

Image

Thus Sacred Heart Academy, above.

Image

Followed by a Jesuit School, Saint Charles College.

Image

And whatever this thing is.

Image

Image

Chretien Point, the local plantation mansion, recently restored and open for tours.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Not exactly Bourbon Street, but what, outside of a themed shopping mall in Canada, is?

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:41 am

why does that house have a staircase going to the roof?
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:53 am

It was once a common arrangement in the bayou country to assist with possible emergency entrance/egress for flooding.

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Sat Jun 16, 2018 5:19 pm

Mill Valley, California, is a suburb of San Francisco, obvsballs.

Image

Image

The seat of the Miwok people for 6,000 years, Mill Valley was settled by the Spanish and was a mission for Mexico until the US decided all their base belong to us.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Now rich hippies live there in fucked up treehouses.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

City Hall.

Image

The high school.

Image

Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

Image

The Fireside, a Prohibition era gin joint.

Image

The famed Buckeye Roadhouse.

Image

I wonder if they have pansy oatmeal?

UPDATE! They don't. https://www.buckeyeroadhouse.com/index.php/dinner-menu/

They have a Whole Foods though, so I expect pansies can buy oatmeal whenever they want.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:58 pm

Mill Valley should not be confused with Grass Valley, although both are in California.

Image

Grass Valley is close to Virginia City, California, which, as you will recall, should not be confused with Virginia City in Nevada or Montana.

Image

It's one of the best preserved towns of the late 1800s in the Sierra Nevada.

Image

Image

Image

The library.

Image

The Del Oro Theater.

Image

The John Pugh mural on the back of the theater.

Image

Northstar House by Julia Morgan.

Image

The Bourne Cottage at the Empire Mine Park.

Image

The mine's, uh, formal garden. Which mines have. Out here.

Image

The mine itself. Looks kind of cool, actually.

Image

BulletPark
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 13600
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 7:40 pm

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by BulletPark » Sun Jun 17, 2018 3:53 pm

And of course neither Mill Valley or Grass Valley should be confused with Rose Valley, Pennsylvania. Which is easy to do, as Rose Valley has grass and a mill.

Image

A portion of the Great Minquas Pass, one of the most important Indian paths in the region.

Image

Founded in the 17th Century as a Quaker Industrial hub, Rose Valley had three important mills through the 18th century. Above, the Bishop House dates to 1695; below, the Vernon House to 1698.

Image

The Tormoden Mansion was built in 1797 out of green Serpentine stone.

Image

Then around 1900 or so Architect Will Price came rolling through.

Image

Within five years he and his fellow architects had transformed what was then a quiet industrial ruin into an arts colony that is one of the most architecturally significant in US history.

Image

Image

Image

The remaining mill buildings were pressed into service as artisan studio space and later became the Hedgerow Theater.

Image

An "Impovement" home - basically a re-do of a derelict 18th century structure. Price did about 20 of these.

Image

He also designed and built his own house.

Image

And his Aunt Bessie's house.

Image

And Thunderbird Lodge for a collector of Native American art, now the Rose Valley Museum.

Image

Image

And reconfigured the water mill as Rose Valley's Town Hall.

Image

But his most important work my be the so-called "House of the Democrat*", which he designed as a worker's house and which was intended to serve as a prototype for a new sort fo dwelling that would put basic comfort in the hands of the American proletariat.

Image

The house was widely published and critically acclaimed; its example was merged into similar forms developed at the time by Frank Lloyd Wright and Greene & Greene to become the classic American and California Bungalow.

Australia - Rose Valley is where your suburbs started.

*Lavite's head ass-plode

User avatar
korgy
Stew Ingredient
Posts: 23944
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:55 am

Re: 50 Towns in 50 States

Post by korgy » Sun Jun 17, 2018 4:37 pm

this is a great thing you're doing here. otoh, the thing about romanticizing all these small towns of architectural/archaeological splendour is now when people drive through the US and see nothing but highways cluttered with Bojangles and Speedy Marts, they're going to wonder what happened.

but please keep it up -- i'm all for romance.
"Iranians apparently disagree with korgy"

Post Reply