Willard still blaming poor people

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joeyramone
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Willard still blaming poor people

Post by joeyramone » Thu Nov 15, 2012 3:43 pm

First, wtf is he doing still "fundraising"?

Second, he's a total douche. I never thought he was this much of a plutocrat, a Mr. Burns carirctaure, but I guess he is.




Mitt Romney Says Obama Won by Giving 'Gifts' to Latino Voters
Published November 15, 2012
Fox News Latino

WASHINGTON – Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney is telling top campaign donors that President Barack Obama won re-election because of the "gifts" he had already given to specific voting groups, particularly Latinos, and because of the president's effort to paint Romney as anti-immigrant.

"The president's campaign, if you will, focused on giving targeted groups a big gift," Romney said in a call to donors on Wednesday. "He made a big effort on small things."

Romney said his campaign, in contrast, had been about "big issues for the whole country." He said he faced problems as a candidate because he was "getting beat up" by the Obama campaign and that the debates allowed him to come back.

In the call, Romney didn't acknowledge any major missteps, such as his "47 percent" remarks widely viewed as denigrating nearly half of Americans, his lack of support for the auto bailout, his call for undocumented immigrants to "self-deport," or his change in position on abortion, gun control and other issues. He also didn't address the success or failure of the campaign's strategy of focusing on the economy in the face of some improvement in employment and economic growth during the months leading up to Election Day.


I know that you expected to win. We expected to win. We were disappointed; we hadn't anticipated it.
- Mitt Romney


Obama won the popular vote by about 3.5 million votes, or 3 percent, and won the Electoral College by a wide margin, 332-206 electoral votes. Exit polls conducted for The Associated Press and television networks showed that Obama led Romney by 11 percentage points among women and won better than 7 of 10 Hispanic voters and more than 9 of 10 black voters.

Romney called his loss to Obama a disappointing result that he and his team had not expected, but he said he believed his team had run a superb campaign. He said he was trying to turn his thoughts to the future, "but, frankly, we're still so troubled by the past, it's hard to put together our plans for the future."

Romney's finance team organized the call to donors. A person who listened to Romney's call provided details about it to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the call was private. The Los Angeles Times first reported Romney's remarks.

Among the "gifts" Romney cited were free health care "in perpetuity," which he said was highly motivational to black and Hispanic voters as well as for voters making $25,000 to $35,000 a year.

Romney also said the administration's promise to offer what he called "amnesty" to the children of illegal immigrants — what he termed "the so-called DREAM Act kids" — helped send Hispanics to the polls for Obama.

Young voters, Romney said, were motivated by the administration's plan for partial forgiveness of college loan interest and being able to remain on their parents' health insurance plans. Young women had an additional incentive to vote for Obama because of free contraception coverage under the president's health care plan, he said.

"I'm very sorry that we didn't win," he told donors. "I know that you expected to win. We expected to win. We were disappointed; we hadn't anticipated it."

Romney said he and his team were discussing how his donor group could remain connected and have an influence on the direction of the Republican Party and even the selection of a future nominee — "which, by the way, will not be me."

Asked about Romney's remarks, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, a potential contender for the GOP nomination in 2016, strongly condemned those in the GOP who classify voters based on income, race or age and said the party cannot concede wide swaths of voters and expect to win elections.

"We have got to stop dividing the American voters," Jindal told reporters in Las Vegas, where the Republican Governors Association was meeting. "We need to go after 100 percent of the vote, not 53 percent. We need to go after every single vote."

Based on reporting by the Associated Press.



Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politi ... z2CJ3kdbK5
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by judik » Thu Nov 15, 2012 4:00 pm

Apparently money does not buy class
Rmoney spent to much time with the Donald
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by joeyramone » Thu Nov 15, 2012 4:17 pm

judik wrote:Apparently money does not buy class
Rmoney spent to much time with the Donald



Good call, Judi.

It appears that he's the mean version of 2004 John kerry.

Oh well, plenty of time to play with his car elevator.

Also, did you hear (I don't know if it's true) that in the tax return that he relased that he didn't take a very common deducation becuase he most likely didn't want to have his tax rate dip even lower than it was? Specualtion is that he'll now simply file an amended return and get an extra $1.5 million back.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by judik » Thu Nov 15, 2012 4:35 pm

I read that too joey
Jindal must be feeling vulnerable
He is a brown person and according to GOP conventional wisdom all brown people are takers
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by joeyramone » Thu Nov 15, 2012 4:52 pm

I read an update on it - it's actually $1.7 million that he failed to take in order to get his tax rate to 13%; one can only uimagine what he paid in previous years. With a little stunt like that, I'm beginning to think maybe Harry Reid was wrong, but not by much.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by salmonid » Thu Nov 15, 2012 7:07 pm

joeyramone wrote:I read an update on it - it's actually $1.7 million that he failed to take in order to get his tax rate to 13%; one can only uimagine what he paid in previous years. With a little stunt like that, I'm beginning to think maybe Harry Reid was wrong, but not by much.


Romney is just collecting one of his many gifts that the American tax code has awarded he and his plutocrat friends.

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by cowtown » Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:12 pm

he's N-bashing to the boys club

Romney called his loss to Obama a disappointing result that he and his team had not expected, but he said he believed his team had run a superb campaign. He said he was trying to turn his thoughts to the future, "but, frankly, we're still so troubled by the past, it's hard to put together our plans for the future."



and he blames Bush too !
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Willard still blaming poor people

Post by cuchulainn » Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:21 pm

Other than fearful old people, Lord Romney's followers are bitter and unlikeable.

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by incognita » Fri Nov 16, 2012 5:46 am

It looks like Romney has less & less followers:

“There is no Romney wing in the party that he needs to address,” said Ed Rogers, a longtime Republican strategist. “He never developed an emotional foothold within the GOP so he can exit the stage anytime and no one will mourn.”
...
The strong intraparty reaction — just nine days after Romney loss the presidential race — speaks to the desire within the professional political ranks of the Republican party to move on as quickly as possible from an election that badly exposed their weaknesses.

The prevailing opinion among that group is that there is much work to be done and that Romney will have a hand in almost none of it. Put more simply: Thanks for playing. Now go away.

Here’s how conservative columnist Matt Lewis put it in a tweet:

I’d like to see Romney and his team go out gracefully. (Yes, that requires actually… going away.)

— Matt K. Lewis (@mattklewis) November 15, 2012


Ouch.

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by joeyramone » Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:03 pm

Its funny that some people were writing "why Mitt Romney is NOT John Kerry", but he of course was John kerry all along. Howard Dean was the guy who people felt passionate about, even though he wasn't electable - he was the Democratic Rick Santorum of 2004. In 2004, no one was toally behind and jazzed about Kerry - a rich guy with some compelling backstory, but who didn't seem to have a driving purpose, and the supporters knew it; he get a vulnerable incumbent walk away with an election.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by tph24601 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:16 pm

Except Kerry is still around, where as GOP can't wait for Romney to get off the stage....

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by rider5 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:23 pm

I'm sure Willard's happy he finally gets to drop the act now that the election is over.

Continued relief from me that he lost.

What's next for him? A sinecure at one of the coin operated think tanks like the Heritage Foundation?

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by brettyb » Sat Nov 17, 2012 4:38 am

Lots of personal hatred of Romney, mixed with an ample dose of jealousy, on display here. Of course, I don't see any denials that what he said was true. Just "controversial" as the media likes to say. Sad that such a good man lost to the charlatan in the White House.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by 2wilzgood » Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:00 am

brettyb wrote: Of course, I don't see any denials that what he said was true.


That 47% will NEVER vote for him? True.

That corporations are people, my friend. Well, there you have it. Choke on it.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by judik » Sat Nov 17, 2012 5:12 am

Lots of personal hatred of Romney, mixed with an ample dose of jealousy

hatred?
No
Disdain mixed with an ample dose of schadenfreud-yeah
And why would anyone be jealous of him? He's a loser so caught up in his own hubris and insulation that he failed to see what was in front of his face
He is to be pitied
A man who couldn't even run his campaign with any efficiency yet expected us to swallow that he could run the country?
Sad that such a good man lost

If he is what you consider a good man,the bar is set pretty low

Of course, I don't see any denials that what he said was true

Have you not read how many of his own party are trying to throw him under the limousine?
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by Lost Soul » Sat Nov 17, 2012 10:44 am

brettyb wrote:Lots of personal hatred of Romney, mixed with an ample dose of jealousy, on display here. Of course, I don't see any denials that what he said was true. Just "controversial" as the media likes to say. Sad that such a good man lost to the charlatan in the White House.

Degreed.

The US is fucked thanks to the mental midgets on display above.

Bravo dipshits.
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Willard still blaming poor people

Post by cuchulainn » Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:28 am

I don't hate the robber barons. I'm just not interested in a return to feudalism.

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by rider5 » Sat Nov 17, 2012 3:36 pm

brettyb posts are comedy gold. I wish he'd post more.

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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by Fred Garvin » Sat Nov 17, 2012 4:40 pm

Romney isn't a charlatan? Quite right, never has there been a more sincere and truthful candidate for president. Seriously, any republican who voted for Romney should be just as embarrassed as any democrat who voted for John Kerry. Voting for, "well, he isn't that guy" is fucking stupid and gets nobody anywhere.
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Re: Willard still blaming poor people

Post by judik » Sat Nov 17, 2012 6:18 pm

The GOP would just wish that good,decent non charletan would go away
They don't care enough about him to hate him
Just like us

Ten days after at least some Republicans were surprised to see Mitt Romney lose the presidency, the candidate is gone without a trace.
There appears to be no Romney Republicanism to propagate. No Romney strategy to emulate. No Romney technology to ape. No generation shaped by his failed effort. And no Romney infrastructure to inherit, though he may still be asked to write and bundle quite a few checks. Romney's bewildering post-election explanations of his defeat — Obama, he said, had bought off Americans — drew almost universal condemnation from leaders of his party, but the comments were more excuse than cause; party figures from Ari Fleischer to Bobby Jindal appeared to be waiting to kick Romney to the side of the road. The candidate did them a favor when he complained that Democrats had simply bought off young people and minority voters, a churlish line that erased any lingering Republican affinity for him as, when all else failed, a good-hearted guy.
Romney is being erased with record speed from his party's books for three reasons. First, many Republicans backed him because they thought he had a good chance of winning; that appeal, obviously, is gone. Second, Romney had shallow roots, and few friends, in the national Republican Party. And those shallow roots have allowed Republicans to give him a new role: As a sort of bad partisan bank, freighted with all the generational positions and postures that they are looking to dump.
"Romney is now a toxic asset to unload," the historian Jack Bohrer remarked Saturday. "The only interesting thing left to his story is how they dispose of him."
The simplest reason for Romney's quick fadeout is that his central promise was that he could win. He delivered immense fundraising prowess and ideological flexibility. He was never going to win partisan hearts like the two iconic, beloved losers of his father's generation, Barry Goldwater and George McGovern.
"This is ever the sad fate of the 'electability' candidate who fails to get elected," tweeted Red State editor Dan McLaughlin.
But other electability candidates have not been subject to the sort of forced amnesia already washing over Romney. John Kerry and John McCain both faced, perhaps, even more bitter recriminations on questions of tactics and strategy from inside their parties —but they returned to important Senate roles, positions of respect in Washington and in their parties, and Kerry may join the next Cabinet.
Other losers can draw, similarly, on deep wells of loyalty at high levels of the party structure. Bob Dole and Walter Mondale got crushed by the last two-term incumbents to serve two terms. They faded fast from the American public imagination, too. But they also retook their seats on the party dais. Mondale, a former Vice President with deep ties to a key constituency, organized labor, became his party's Senate nominee after Paul Wellstone died in 2002. Dole, a beloved war hero and longtime party soldier, received the Medal of Freedom from Bill Clinton in 1997, and was appointed by George W. Bush to chair a commission a decade later.
Romney was a party outsider who bought his way in. The campaigns he came up working for — his father's — operated in the essentially defunct moderate Republican tradition he abandoned, though a few of its stragglers staffed his headquarters in ... Boston. Much of his inner circle consisted of people whose loyalty was to Romney, not to his party or even his platform; that was also true of his most enthusiastic volunteers.
Now Republicans don't even seem to want to pile on Romney. Karl Rove and the SuperPAC infrastructure have absorbed as much disgust from donors and activists as Romney's campaign, which found a message in the fall after a dismal summer. Recriminations, such as they are, have focused on the collapse of a glorified digital list called Orca. Republicans just want to forget Romney.
That's because many of the Republican Party's leaders are, in fact, eager to change. Parties and politicians pivot faster than their friends or enemies ever imagine, and the Republican Party of Bobby Jindal and Marco Rubio is pivoting very fast. And for all the reasons that Romney is easy for Republicans to forget, he offers them thy ideal sacrifice. Conservatives were always too fond of Barry Goldwater to write him off as the "extremist" Democrats successfully cast him as; they never liked Mitt Romney anyway, and will gladly remember him for his most odious comments.
There is an irony that Romney, the moderate, will be forced to carry off Todd Akin's baggage on reproductive rights; Joe Arpaio's on immigration; and James Dobson on gay rights. But when he cast popular policies as "gifts" to Obama voters (ignoring both his and Obama's expensive promises to older voters), his decision to, as Bobby Jindal put it, "insult" the demographic groups who are a larger part of each successive electorate offered the Republicans the pivot they had been looking for toward presenting a younger, more diverse, and more inclusive party.
Now Romney's own party will gladly let him, and his reputation, carry off the values for which he is only now, for the first time, really the spokesman.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/bensmith/why-republicans-want-to-make-mitt-romney-go-away
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