de-branning

Killing the internets, one recipe at a time

Moderator: Moderator

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16389
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:45 pm
Location: Tucson

de-branning

Postby rider5 » Sun Oct 08, 2017 4:26 am

Have we made a serious mistake on a civilizational level by removing the bran off of all our grains? That's throwing away a healthy nutritional fraction of a major foodstuff.

Why do we prefer white rice and white bread over the whole grain product?

Queen Bee
User avatar
Posts: 48185
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 8:48 am
Location: Just south of the North Pole

Re: de-branning

Postby northern_goddess » Sun Oct 08, 2017 1:53 pm

rider5 wrote:
Why do we prefer white rice and white bread over the whole grain product?


I don't think we do. At least not anymore. I can't think of the last time I saw white bread anywhere.
I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd never expect it.

http://www.fat-pie.com/salad.htm

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 6467
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 3:21 pm
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: de-branning

Postby Stan In Maryland » Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:31 pm

I think both were seen as being "more affluent". I can't tell you the last time there was plain white bread in our house. Sometimes for rolls for some sandwiches (like hamburgers) we use rolls made with white flour. I do generally still prefer white rice when we have rice, but that isn't very often.
"As a child I wanted to be a grown-up. I wanted to know everything - not that I like to talk about it. I hate intellectual conversation with intellectuals because I only care about my opinion."

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16164
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:53 pm
Location: Lungsod ng Maynila

Re: de-branning

Postby EMG » Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:47 pm

There's a show on Netflix called 'Cooked' with Michael Pollan. His episode 'Air' is all about bread and goes over this (among other things).

Removing the bran made bread easier to chew, but more importantly (for the food industry) made its shelf life longer. So white bread exploded onto the market when the milling technology made de-branning possible on a large scale.
However, by suddenly mass producing bread with no bran and no vitamins, lots of people started to get sick because they replaced a major food source that was full of vitamins with one that was devoid of vitamin.

As a response to this crisis, bread companies started 'fortifying' their white bread with vitamins, and marketing it as 'fortified!' and 'enriched!' Ingeniously creating a marketing pitch by adding vitamins to bread that would've already been in the bread if they hadn't de-branned in the first place.

Fast forward a half a century and we have diabetes. Some of which may to be blame on white bread.

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 6467
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 3:21 pm
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: de-branning

Postby Stan In Maryland » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:21 pm

EMG wrote:There's a show on Netflix called 'Cooked' with Michael Pollan. His episode 'Air' is all about bread and goes over this (among other things).

Removing the bran made bread easier to chew, but more importantly (for the food industry) made its shelf life longer. So white bread exploded onto the market when the milling technology made de-branning possible on a large scale.
However, by suddenly mass producing bread with no bran and no vitamins, lots of people started to get sick because they replaced a major food source that was full of vitamins with one that was devoid of vitamin.

As a response to this crisis, bread companies started 'fortifying' their white bread with vitamins, and marketing it as 'fortified!' and 'enriched!' Ingeniously creating a marketing pitch by adding vitamins to bread that would've already been in the bread if they hadn't de-branned in the first place.

Fast forward a half a century and we have diabetes. Some of which may to be blame on white bread.

EMG,.

That is really interesting. I had really thought that the preference for white bread had something to do with a view of "rich people" buying whites bread. I know where I got that from, when my daughter was living in Namibia the fist time she went to the store there the clerk pushed her toward white bread explaining that was the bread for her, only poor people bought the other bread. I took my daughter some work before she could convince them that she wanted the whole grain bread. Of course my daughter rarely ever having had white bread growing up was pretty insistent about what she wanted.
"As a child I wanted to be a grown-up. I wanted to know everything - not that I like to talk about it. I hate intellectual conversation with intellectuals because I only care about my opinion."

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16164
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:53 pm
Location: Lungsod ng Maynila

Re: de-branning

Postby EMG » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:24 am

I re-watched the episode just to check my previous statements, Stan.

Pollan's spiel is that: historically 'bread' was defined by the FDA as 3 ingredients. Flour, salt, water. However humans moved from whole grains ground on a stone to white flour ground on a roller mill. Roller milling was not only cheaper, but white flour was nonperishable. So mills could produce and ship around the world.

White bread did indeed have great prestige and importance before roller milling. Few people could afford it. But roller milling found a common ground: cheaper, nonperishable, white flour. That's what they marketed and sold, successfully.

Then, after discovering the bread with no vitamins lead to sickness, the FDA allowed bread companies to "fortify" bread and the FDA allowed the definition of bread to include dozens of ingredients.

They mass marketed the fancy new white bread, and the public continued to buy what became Wonderbread.

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 6467
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 3:21 pm
Location: Maryland, USA

Re: de-branning

Postby Stan In Maryland » Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:17 pm

Thanks. I always knew Wonder Bread would make you sick.
"As a child I wanted to be a grown-up. I wanted to know everything - not that I like to talk about it. I hate intellectual conversation with intellectuals because I only care about my opinion."

Stew Ingredient
User avatar
Posts: 51209
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:35 pm

Re: de-branning

Postby VinnyD » Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:39 pm

On rice: White rice cooks a lot faster than brown rice. In most places, the labor involved in dehusking rice is probably less than the labor of gathering (or acquiring the wherewithal to purchase) the extra fuel required.

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16389
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:45 pm
Location: Tucson

Re: de-branning

Postby rider5 » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:18 am

I seldom buy sandwich bread, the same type as wonder bread. But what I do buy (baguette, french, croissants, flour tortillas, ciabatta, pizza crust, biscuits, kaiser rolls) is still made with with de-branned white flour. Is it different where you guys live?

Queen Bee
User avatar
Posts: 48185
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2005 8:48 am
Location: Just south of the North Pole

Re: de-branning

Postby northern_goddess » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:50 am

I guess I rarely eat bread, but when I do it is usually 100% whole wheat... regardless of whether it is bread or rolls. I eat pizza and tortillas and/or baguettes or croissants so seldom that they don't really figure into my thinking. I bet I haven't eaten a biscuit in over 15 years.
I can picture in my mind a world without war, a world without hate. And I can picture us attacking that world, because they'd never expect it.

http://www.fat-pie.com/salad.htm

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16389
Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2005 4:45 pm
Location: Tucson

Re: de-branning

Postby rider5 » Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:37 am

You don't bake then.

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 16164
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:53 pm
Location: Lungsod ng Maynila

Re: de-branning

Postby EMG » Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:15 am

rider5 wrote:I seldom buy sandwich bread, the same type as wonder bread. But what I do buy (baguette, french, croissants, flour tortillas, ciabatta, pizza crust, biscuits, kaiser rolls) is still made with with de-branned white flour. Is it different where you guys live?



Nope. Same for me. And when I make bread I use white flour.

Stew Ingredient
User avatar
Posts: 51209
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:35 pm

Re: de-branning

Postby VinnyD » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:00 am

I would say that about 2/3 of the bread I eat is white. About 4/5 of the rice I eat is white.

Stew Ingredient
User avatar
Posts: 22953
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2012 3:46 pm
Location: South east UK.

Re: de-branning

Postby leela » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:38 pm

I thought bran was just fibre. Does it really have that much in the way of vitamins?
Pass the wine...

Stew Ingredient
User avatar
Posts: 51209
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:35 pm

Re: de-branning

Postby VinnyD » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:44 pm

I don't know if bran is the right word. But if you turn brown rice into white rice, you lose the B vitamin a deficiency in which leads to beri-beri. Niacin?

And white flour is missing the germ as well as as the bran. The germ is oily, which is why white flour keeps better than whole-grain flour, but it also has significant nutrients, minerals as well as vitamins I think.

From memory. Check before you rely on this.

Stew Ingredient
User avatar
Posts: 51209
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:35 pm

Re: de-branning

Postby VinnyD » Thu Oct 12, 2017 1:45 pm

Thiamine. B1. It's also in wheat germ. Wiki: "Wheat germ or wheatgerm is a concentrated source of several essential nutrients including Vitamin E, folate (folic acid), phosphorus, thiamin, zinc, and magnesium, as well as essential fatty acids and fatty alcohols."

Stew Ingredient
Posts: 8349
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:19 pm

Re: de-branning

Postby Logg » Fri Oct 13, 2017 4:56 am

I 'splurge' on Alvarado St. whole grain bread. It's sandwich bread, but I only use it for toast. I eat a lot of it.

Interestingly, I buy white-flour pita from Trader Joe's and it goes moldy pretty quickly, which I take as a good sign that it's not too processed.

The same dynamic is true for cooked grain cereals. Cream of Wheat is like Wonder Bread. I think regular Quaker Oats style oatmeal is also somewhat debranned. Steel cut oats aka Irish oatmeal is the way to go. Takes longer to cook.

Return to The Root Sauce

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest